Bianca Wave

5 Nov

newwave

A while back I found a couple of knitting books on sale. This was one of them (it’s Knitting New Scarves by Lynne Barr). The book contains a lot of great looking classic scarves with a twist, and also a few I would never wear (a scarf that looks like an octopus tentacle, for one).

From the first time I leafed through the book, I was intrigued by a lot of the patterns, but still it ended up among the knitting books I’ve never used. (Those books are starting to pile up.) I always felt bad about it because this book is one of those books that deserves to be cherished and used until pages start falling off and the whole thing is covered in bread crumbs and coffee stains. Why? Because it’s so innovative. Every pattern uses a unique technique. This also happens to be the reason why I never got around to trying any of the patterns. They just seem so complicated… until you pick up the needles and *try*, it turns out.

This, of course, holds true for most of knitting patterns, at least for me. They often seem difficult when I read through them for the first couple of times, but when I start following the instructions needle and yarn in hand, everything works out easily.

So after such a long time of feeling guilty for never giving the book a proper chance, I finally decided it was time, and started knitting the first pattern I came across in the book that seemed both relatively easy and stylish to me: the Easy Wave. I like the pattern because, until you touch the scarf, it kind of looks like it’s wavy only because it’s been blocked to stay that way, somehow. In reality, the fabric forms the waves. The secret is in the rib: it’s divided on two needles, and a few rows are knitted on the other needle only. Then the stitches on both needles are joined again into one fabric.

It’s pretty slow going, but I really like the result. My only worry is the yarn: the colorway isn’t what I was hoping for. I’m using Bianca by Novita. It’s 100 % wool, and I plan to look into dying yarn. Maybe I can dye the scarf once it’s finished, and get rid of that combination of purples and turquoise that “more or less exactly fails to please the eye”. Well, my eye at least.

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