My Yarn Raid to a Neighbouring Town

5 Mar

I’m on spring break! To celebrate the beginning of the week off (as much as any student ever really takes time off…) I decided to check out a yarn store in a small town outside my city: Käsityökauppa Ilo located in Haukipudas.

The store had an amazing selection – although I suppose this is entirely subjective. They had quite a lot of wool from Finnish sheep, lots of yarns I haven’t encountered before and some of my old favourites. I had a hard time not squealing with delight too much.

I was especially excited to find they carry Schoppel-Wolle’s Zauberball and Crazy Zauberball yarns. I bought one ball of Zauberball from Germany, and have since only seen them being sold in internet stores. I don’t like to order yarn online, so I jumped at the chance to get my hands on some Zauberball goodness now.

I also found the perfect yarn for a pair of knee-high socks I’ve had my eye on for a while now.

I got 2 skeins (200 g) of Seehawer & Siebert’s Sockenwolle. It’s a fingering weight wool and ramie blend. Even though the lady at the store carefully explained how I should take care of the finished object, it never really sink in that ramie is a kind of plant fiber. I only noticed it when I added the yarn to my Raverly stash. I don’t suppose it will make a difference: I never machine wash anything knitted anyway. As long as the socks don’t wear out straight away, I’m happy.

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2 Responses to “My Yarn Raid to a Neighbouring Town”

  1. Karen Berthine May 23, 2012 at 07:11 #

    I too enjoy finding fiber-related delights in new towns. Many years ago while visiting Canada, I drove through a little area (town?) called, if I remember correctly, Pickle Ridge. There I bought amazing pewter buttons shaped like tulips bent to form a circle with their stem. Amazing finds at that store!

    • bamboo#1 May 23, 2012 at 10:07 #

      That’s so nice! I love how the memory of the place where some neat little thing was found is then attached to that thing and becomes part of the history of a garment or other hand-made object.

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